Are You Eating Enough Colour?

Are you Eating Enough Colour

We’ve all heard the phrase “eat your greens”.  But, what we should really be eating is the rainbow.  Phytonutrients come in all different colours—green, yellow-orange, red, blue-purple, and white.  Different colours contain different compounds.  Each of which have unique healing properties.  In order to promote good health eating a variety of colours is crucial.



What Are Phytonutrients?

The term “Phytonutrients” refers to the several thousand healthful, non-nutritive compounds found in plants. These compounds are referred to as “non-nutritive” because they do not supply calories like proteins, carbohydrates, or fats do.

Despite this, they benefit the body in several ways.  Studies show that people who eat more plant foods have reduced risk of chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

In the plant itself, phytonutrients provide many functions.  They protect the plant from pests and environmental stressors, and impart colour and distinctive tastes and smells.

In the human body, phytonutrients;
  • Stimulate enzymes that help the body get rid of toxins
  • Boost the immune system
  • Improve cardiovascular health
  • Promote healthy estrogen metabolism
  • Stimulate the death of cancer cells

This is all pretty powerful stuff!

The Impact Of ‘Colour’

Organic fruits and vegetables are rich sources of phytonutrients.  Same with legumes, herbs/spices, nuts/seeds, and teas.  Aiming for one to two of each colour per day is a healthy goal to strive for.

Darker-coloured plants are generally higher in phytonutrients.  However, fruits and veggies from the white family do have potent contributions to make.

What Do The Different Colours Mean?

red foods

Red foods contain phytonutrients that may help reduce the risk of certain cancers and protect the brain, heart, liver, and immune system.

Examples of red foods:
  • Beets
  • Bell pepper
  • Blood oranges
  • Cranberries
  • Cherries
  • Grapefruit (pink)
  • Goji berries
  • Grapes
  • Onions
  • Plums
  • Pomegranate
orange foods

Orange foods help protect the immune system, eyes, and skin.  They also reduce the risk of cancer and heart disease.

Examples of orange foods:
  • Apricots
  • Bell pepper
  • Cantaloupe
  • Carrots
  • Mango
  • Nectarine
  • Orange
  • Papaya
yellow foods

Yellow foods are beneficial because they contain compounds that are anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory.  They protect the brain, heart and vasculature.  In addition to your eyes, and skin.

Examples of yellow foods:
  • Apples
  • Asian Pears
  • Bananas
  • Bell Peppers
  • Star Fruit
  • Squash
green foods

Green foods contain compounds that are anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory.  They too protect the brain, heart and vasculature, liver, and skin.  In addition, green foods that help with liver function also help balance hormones.

Examples of green foods:
  • Avocados
  • Asparagus
  • Green Apples
  • Bell Peppers
  • Bean Sprouts
  • Bok Choy
  • Broccoli
  • Zucchini
  • Okra
  • Cabbage
  • Celery
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Cucumbers
purple foods

Blue/Purple/Black foods contain compounds that are anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory.  They too protect the brain, and heart and vasculature.  It’s interesting to note that out of all the colours, this is the category that most people eat the least of.

Too little blue/purple can result in issues with the brain.  This is because these foods protect the brain from damage.  In addition they also promote healthy cognition and memory.
Examples of blue/purple/black foods:
  • Berries
  • Eggplants
  • Figs
  • Plums
  • Prunes
  • Raisins

White/Tan/Brown foods – When thinking of white/tan/brown foods, processed foods may come to mind.  Foods such as;

  • Bagels
  • Cereals
  • Breads
  • Pastas
  • Cakes
  • Cookies
  • Crackers

Avoid those and focus on foods that are beneficial to your health such as;

nuts and seeds
  • Nuts
  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Legumes
  • Spices
  • Seeds

The compounds in these earthy coloured foods are anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory.  Additionally, like green foods, there are certain compounds that can assist with liver and hormone health.

Examples of white/tan/brown foods:
  • Ginger
  • Apples
  • Cacao
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Coffee
  • Coconut
  • Dates
  • Mushrooms
  • Nuts
  • Beans
  • Tea

Eating by Colour

Easy Ways To Eat Your Colours

Start by observing the colours you eat.  Humans are creatures of habit.  As such we generally tend to eat the same foods over and over again.  This does our body a disservice.

In order to get more phytonutrients into your diet, you are going to have to mix things up!   It has been estimated that 80% of people are missing one or more of the phytonutrient colours in their diet.  Which sounds likely when you think that most people stick to eating processed foods that are brown, yellow, or white.

Think of a typical breakfast menu – waffles, pancakes, ready-to-eat cereal, sausage, and eggs.  This doesn’t provide very many phytonutrients now, does it?  Opting for a fruit smoothie with blueberries, peaches, raspberries and spinach would be way more beneficial. There’s four of the seven colours done for the day.

Click here for “Breakfast On The Go – Mixed Berry Smoothie” recipe.

Note: When implementing this way of eating, keep in mind that fruits contain sugar.  Even though it’s a natural form of sugar, fruits can still spike insulin levels.  As such, be sure to load your cart with heaps of colourful vegetables and just a few fruit.

Click here to read, “Is It Time To Stop Eating Fruit?”

Simple Ways To Jump Start A Phytonutrient Diet

First, make it your goal to try one new plant food (fruit, vegetable, nut, seed or legume) per week.  Explore ethnic stores for greater variety.  Second, stock up on organic frozen vegetables for easy cooking or organic berries as they tend to retain their phytonutrients well.  Third, keep fruits and vegetables where you can see them.  This will help you to remember to eat them.

Next, keep a bowl or container of fresh cut vegetables on the top shelf of refrigerator.  Always within easy reach.  If you must eat something sweet after dinner, choose a fruit for dessert (fruit kabobs, berry compotes, fruit salads, etc.)  Have dishes with lots of vegetable variety (e.g., soups, stir-fry).

Try and choose darker vegetables over lighter to maximize nutrient content.  Make the switch from mashed white potatoes to sliced carrots or mashed cauliflower.  Also, toss in red pepper, tomato sauce, garlic, onions or broccoli to omelets.

You can also add rinds of oranges or lemons to your water.  Try a little bit of every colour at a salad bar.  Be generous with your use of herbs and spice.  Devote some time at the start of your week to prepare your meals and recipes.  This will make eating whole foods throughout the week so much easier!

Make It Easy!

To make things easier for myself, I re-arranged my fridge to emphasize the food colours.  Forget separating fruits and vegetables.  I now separate things by colour.  It’s made preparing my meals and shakes so much easier.  I open the fridge and grab at least one or two items from each group.  It’s a good reminder to add variety to my dishes and it looks pretty!

It is also a great way to teach kids about the importance of healthy, colourful foods.  Make them choose which colours they want to eat.  Try making it into a little game.  Have a colour chart that they can check off each day to make sure that they are eating all the colours of the rainbow.

Now go on, eat the rainbow.  Your cells will thank you for it!

Healthy Chocolate Truffles

chocolate truffles

Looking for a dessert that is sure to please everyone including the health nut in the family??  Surprise your guests by making these healthy chocolate truffles using my secret ingredient, avocado!  Your guests will never know that these are a healthy alternative to the traditional truffle, only that they taste great.

Ingredients:

Makes 15 truffles

• 100g dark chocolate (I used 85% cocoa)

• 1 avocado (~100g)

• 3 tbsp maple syrup

• 1 tbsp cocoa powder (raw – unsweetened)

• 1 tbsp grated coconut

 

Directions:

1. Place the avocado in a food processor and pulse a few times into a smooth puree.

2. Melt the chocolate and let it cool down 10-15 min.

3. Pour melted chocolate into food processor with the avocado and maple syrup and pulse until mixture is completely combined and avocado is no longer visible.

4. Pour the mixture in a bowl and cover it.

5. Refrigerate for 2h.

6. Fill a bowl with cocoa powder and another with grated coconut

7. Shape the truffles with your hands

8. Roll each truffles into the coating

9. Place it in a food container and store in the fridge for min 1h before eating.

ENJOY!!

Note: Store well in the fridge up to 4 days

Become a Fat-Burning Machine

Become a Fat-Burning Machine

Today’s society has taught us the foundational habits that put us on the fast-track to obesity, chronic illness, disease and a shortened lifespan. One of the most dangerous habits practiced by nearly everyone you know and very likely you too, is poor nutrition. Ouch! But it’s true… Read on!

Our culture has fostered in each of us eating habits that has made us a society of heavy carb-consumers, carb-burners, carb-cravers and fat storers! And it’s these habits that have set the stage for many of the devastating plagues of the day – namely diabetes, heart disease, cancer and as a result, a shorter life.

So what does this have to do with burning fat and becoming a fat burning machine?

Everything! Yes, how we eat has literally programmed our bodies to crave fast fuel carbohydrates as our predominant fuel source and subsequently for many, to store fat on our bodies at an alarming rate.  And we hate it because it makes us look and feel crappy. Possibly the most upsetting reality is that many of the  ‘experts’ have literally taught us it’s the right way to eat to be healthy.  Well, not if you look at the science. In fact, research has shown countries who consume the highest percentage of fat, particularly saturated fat have been shown to have the lowest risk of heart disease! It’s the exact opposite of what we’ve been taught.

Truth be told, it’s very simple — you burn what you eat. If you keep eating sugar (carbohydrate)  you’re going to burn sugar and sadly you’ll store the excess as – you guessed it!   FAT!   But if you consume more fat, much more fat – particularly healthy fats, you’re going to teach your body to preferentially burn fat as it’s primary fuel. And it’s not just the fat you ate at dinner, but also that unwanted body fat will start to burn away too. If there was a secret to this then that’s it. If you want to burn fat, you have to eat fat. Eating fat does not make you fat, in fact, it’s quite the opposite. Eating fat makes you an efficient fat burner. It can actually make you leaner. Not only that, healthy fats are crucial for many body processes not the least of which is your brain function. In fact, your brain cannot function properly without fat. 

All the while, many nutrition ‘experts’ still tell us to eat a low fat diet to stay lean and avoid cardiovascular disease and outright heart attacks. Unfortunately the science just doesn’t support that. Not only that, but observation and experience doesn’t support that either. After decades of avoiding fat we’re more overweight, even obese than ever before in history and cardiovascular disease is still the number one killer with the incidence going up, not down. What we’re doing is not working.

The next logical question would then be, ‘What kind of healthy fats should I be eating?’

Some of the best sources of healthy fat are avocados and avocado oil, coconut oil, olive oil (but olive oil not heated to boil or smoke point), butter from grass fed (pastured) cows, MCT oil and organic pastured egg yolks are a great place to start. Healthy omega 3 fat sources (that are essential for optimal brain health) would be flax seeds and flax seed oil, and fish oils, particularly sardines, anchovies, salmon or krill oil. Fats to avoid would be the trans fats in margarine, vegetable shortening, and partially hydrogenated vegetable oils. Avoid these like the plague. Run, hide and be very afraid! They’re dangerous to your health. If you’re going to be consuming more fat, eating the right kind of right fat is key.

So now we know which fats to choose, the next question is how much fat do we need.

Although the simple answer is more, the latest science recommends that healthy fats should comprise anywhere from 50 to 85 percent of your overall energy intake. That is easily 2-4 times what that we’ve been told to eat!  So definitely more. However, remember that fat is higher in calories but small in terms of volume so when you look at how much space it takes up on your plate, the largest portion should still be vegetables.

At the same time, it’s a good idea to cut back on those unhealthy carbohydrates – namely bread, pasta, cereal and baked goods, not just the obvious — cookies, chips, bagels, and  french fries, sugar and sweets – the blatant no-no’s. Also avoid processed or added fructose, particularly high-fructose corn syrup which is staple in nearly every soft drink out there today. Do your body a favour — Read labels!

But remember, everybody is different and unique in their exact needs. While making the move to a diet that is higher in healthy fat, proportionately lower in carbohydrates and moderate in protein will make huge health strides for the vast majority of people, our specific needs are individual so it’s important to know there’s not an exact ratio that’s perfect for everyone. Getting to know how your body runs best can be measured with various tests, but also by how you perform and feel.

So if you’re like nearly everyone out there today that wants to become that fat burning machine to shed that excess body fat and body weight, while at the same time significantly lower your risk for conditions like diabetes, heart disease and cancer, you’ll want to strongly consider upping your intake of healthy fats and and proportionately cutting back those unhealthy carbs. It truly can be the formula for you becoming a fat-burning machine, a you that is efficiently losing weight, feeling great and living a longer, healthier life.

Blog by Guest Author: 

Dr. Mark FoullongDr. Mark Foullong has prided himself for over 20 years in delivering the highest quality of health care to Orangeville and surrounding areas.  Dr. Mark graduated with honours from Canadian Memorial Chiropractic with a 4-year Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree.  Prior to that, his studies were in Honours Biochemistry at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario.  Because of his passion in helping families maximize their health and well being and also his love of children, he further completed 1 year of specialized training in Paediatrics granting him Fellowship status from the International Chiropractic Paediatrics Association (F.I.C.P.A.).  He does what he loves and loves what he does.

Dr. Mark has been in private practice in Orangeville since 1995.  He has built, and now alongside Dr. Trevor Middleton and Dr. Jess Willox, run the largest Chiropractic practice in Dufferin County.  Dr. Mark and his team constantly strive to be the best they can for their patients and to stay on the cutting edge of the latest technology and information in health delivery.  As such, the team is involved with regular continuing education and training.  They travel thousands of miles and spending hundreds of hours every year to remain the health leaders in their community and their profession.

Find Dr. Mark Foullong at: 

web:  www.orangevillechiropractor.com
facebook:  @dufferinfamilychiropractic
Twitter:  @OvilleChiro
Youtube:  Orangeville Chiropractor – Dufferin Family Chiropractic
Instagram:  @Orangeville_Chiropractor

How Do You Know If Your Baby Is Ready For Solid Foods and What to Start With

How Do You Know If Your Baby Is Ready For Solid Foods and What to Start With

Introducing solid foods to your growing baby’s diet is a huge milestone for both you as a parent, and your child. Up until now, meal preparation and consideration has been fairly straightforward. The options were limited to breastmilk or formula. 

Now, the idea of introducing solid foods to your baby’s diet can be a daunting task because of conflicting information and the fear of developing severe food reactions or allergies. 

Being armed with solid information on how to best introduce solids to your baby’s diet will alleviate some of the worry and concern and will hopefully allow the transition to be smooth and rewarding.

How Do You Know If Your Baby Is Ready For Solid Foods?

There are several milestone markers that you will start to notice that indicate that your baby is ready to start introducing solid foods in their diet.

Most often these milestones begin to present themselves when the child is around six months of age, however every child will be slightly different.

It is crucially important that your baby can hold his/her own head up and can sit upright in a highchair before ever considering the option of solid foods. 

They will also need to have developed the ability to move their tongue in a way that would allow them to move the food to the back of their mouth and swallow. 

Finally, you may have noticed that your baby takes interest in what you are eating and reaches out to touch or smell your food.

Once you feel that your baby has reached all of these milestones, it is time to think about what solid food to feed your child first.

My Doctor Is Recommending That I Start My Baby Off With Rice Cereal (Pablum). Is That Really The Best Option?

Let’s think for a moment about the most vitamin and nutrient dense food groups.

Do processed grains come to mind? No, of course they don’t.
So then what food group should we be looking to? Fruits and vegetables, of course!

One of the simplest and most nutrient dense options to introduce as a first food is avocado. It requires no preparation whatsoever. Just cut it open, remove the pit, mash up the flesh (much like you would mash a banana) and serve. It can also be easily mixed with a bit of breast milk or formula to change the consistency and make it easier for your baby to consume.

Solid Food Quick Tips

  • Introduce one food at a time with a couple of days in between foods to watch for potential food reactions and to allow your baby’s palette to develop.
  • Hold off on introducing sweet fruits and vegetables until your baby has developed a palette for the more bland fruits and vegetables.
  • Keep a food diary for the first month to record likes, dislikes, reactions, etc so you have a record to look back on.
  • Be patient. This is a learning curve for both you and your baby. If your baby loses interest don’t force the issue. Maintain your regular breastfeeding/formula schedule and slowly introduce solid foods as a supplement to their diet.
  • Take the stress out of meal times. The attitude you have during feeding times will stick with your baby for life, so maintain a positive approach and don’t get frustrated.

Healthy Summer Recipes

Healthy Summer Recipes

Summer is on its way – can you feel it? I certainly can. That warm breeze pouring in my windows has me on the edge of my seat for summer salsas, delicious salads and refreshing mocktails.

These are my favourite recipes right now!! I’ve personally created them and tested them with many family members, and they’re all a huge hit!

Here is your It’s-Almost-Summer-Let’s-Celebrate Recipe Compilation…

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I Feel Like I’m at the Beach Tropical Mocktail

To your high speed blender, add…

3 peeled oranges (leave them whole)
2 cups frozen pineapple chunks
5 large frozen strawberries
1 frozen banana
1.5 cups water
6 ice cubes

Blend and serve!! Enjoy this kick of immune boosting vitamin C, fat busting bromelain and packed in nutrients from these superfoods!

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Sweet and Spicy Summer Salsa

To a medium sized bowl, add…

1 chopped mango
2 chopped roma tomatoes
1/2 red onion chopped tiny
1 chopped avocado
1/2 chopped jalapeño pepper
1/4 tsp sea salt sprinkled over it
Then add juice of 1 lime (which will disperse the salt throughout)

Stir well and enjoy as a side to barbecued chicken, with as-healthy-as-you-can-find-or-make nacho chips or as a dip for vegetables.

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Summer Spinach Raw Vegan Caesar Salad

To a large bowl, add…

1 bunch shredded organic baby spinach
1/2 head of red leaf lettuce (or romaine – choose your favourite! This adds texture and different green nutrients)
1 sweet pepper – choose your colour and chop
1 roma tomato – chopped
1/2 cucumber – chopped
1 bunch of grapes – sliced in half

Raw Vegan Caesar Dressing

(Ditch the store bough chemicalized, food-like dressing and make your own!! This literally tastes IDENTICAL to Caesar dressing, it’s SO delicious!)

To a high speed blender, add…

1/3 cup raw cashews
2/3 cup water
2.5 tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp garlic powder
10 shakes sea salt
6 shakes pepper

Let this soak for 15 minutes before blending to allow cashews to soften and make the recipe creamy. Pour over your salad bowl, mix and enjoy!

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I Just Spent $150 on Groceries and Then Ordered Take Out

$150 groceries

“I just bought $150 worth of groceries and then ordered takeout because I couldn’t be bothered with the hassle of deciding what to cook.”

Having just heard this from a dear friend, I am wondering, has this ever happened to you?

Don’t fall victim to ordering high calorie takeout while you have a fridge full of perfectly good food!

Planning is the key to staying on track with your chosen lifestyle of eating a diet rich in whole foods. In a world full of fast food options and busy schedules, it is easy to get distracted from eating well. I have outlined some tips and tricks to stick to help us all stick to a healthy diet.

Half the battle of making nutritious meals is having all of the ingredients stocked in your pantry or refrigerator. Before you do your weekly grocery shop, sit down and make a meal plan for the week. At the same time, create your shopping list to reflect the ingredients that you will need for your week’s meals.

Remember that flyers are your friend. Not only are flyers meant to point out the weekly sales, but they can also act as an inspiration for your meal planning. Flyers generally feature fruits and vegetables that are in season or are at least readily available and cost effective. Use the flyers to choose a star ingredient for each meal and then develop your meal plan around those star ingredients.

Leftovers are a time saver. Batch cooking is an easy way to ensure that you have leftovers on hand, so that on nights that time doesn’t allow you to be in the kitchen to prepare a meal from scratch, you have something to easily heat up and have on the table in minutes. Try making a large pot of soup, stew or chilli to have in the fridge or freezer for quick, easy meals.

Try adding the following recipe to your meal plan next week.

loaded sweet potatoes

Loaded sweet potatoes

2 large sweet potatoes
1 small sweet onion, diced
1 jalapeño pepper (remove seeds for less spice)
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tsp garlic powder
sea salt

Guacamole Topping

1 avocado
1 roma tomato
1/4 sweet onion, diced
1 jalapeño pepper, finely chopped (optional)
sea salt
juice of one lime

Preheat oven to 375ªF. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Cut sweet potatoes lengthwise and then thinly slice. Dice onion and jalapeño pepper. Add sweet potatoes, onion and jalapeño pepper to a bowl. Toss with olive oil, garlic powder and sea salt to taste. Bake sweet potatoes until tender.

While sweet potatoes are baking, prepare guacamole topping. Cut avocado in half and remove the large seed. Using a spoon, scoop out the flesh of the avocado into a bowl and chop into small pieces. Dice tomato, onion and jalapeño and add to the bowl. Add a pinch of sea salt to the avocado mixture and add the juice of one lime.  Mix well.

Serve the sweet potatoes and top with guacamole.

Serve the loaded sweet potatoes with a garden salad, and a protein of your choice (free-range chicken, wild-caught cold water fish, grass fed beef). Enjoy!

Healthy Salad Dressing Recipes

salad dressings

How is it possible that when you order a salad at many restaurants, you end up eating more fat, calories and preservatives than if you’d just ordered the hamburger?  Think salad dressing from the grocery store are any better?  No way! Most salad dressing are filled with nastiness – so let’s make our own!

But first, let’s talk about how to make a real salad as your whole meal. It’s not just a few sad pieces of romaine lettuce with some croutons anymore!

Rainbow Salad

Salads are all about colour. Throw as many colours in there as possible. Start with a huge bowl because you know it’s going to grow outta control!  To learn more about why ‘eating colour’ is so important, click here to read “Are You Eating Enough Colour?”

1/2 head of Red Leaf Lettuce
2 handfuls spinach
1/2 of red, orange and yellow peppers
15 chopped purple grapes
1/3 chopped cucumber
10 chopped cherry tomatoes
and any other colourful ingredients you like! Raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, celery, broccoli, cauliflower and sprouts!

Chunky Mango-Avocado Dream

Into a bowl, chop…

2 roma tomatoes
1 soft, ripe mango
1 soft, ripe avocado
1/2 red onion

Add a few pinches of salt and the juice of 1/2 a lemon. Stir it up and pour over your salad. Mmm!! This recipe can also be used as a dip for your vegetables or eaten with a spoon. So delicious!

Caesar Dressing

Soak 1/3 cup raw cashews for 30 minutes
Then add to blender with…
1/4 cup water
juice from 1/2 lemon
1/2 tsp garlic powder
2 pinches salt
4 shakes pepper
1 tsp dijon mustard.

Blend and enjoy!

Raspberry Basil Drizzle

To a high speed blender, add…

1/2 cup raspberries (or strawberries)
2 pitted dates
6 leaves fresh basil
splash of water for blending

Vegan Cheesey Sauce

Soak 10 raw cashews for 10 minutes
Then add to blender with…
1 pitted date
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 large red bell pepper
3 tbsp nutritional yeast (Bragg’s is a good brand – find it at Health Food Store)
6 shakes cayenne pepper (more or less if you like it spicy or not!)
pinch salt

Blend this up and pour over your salad. It’s also a delicious dip for your veggies or if you make kale chips.

Easy Fruit Dressing

To a blender, add…
1/2 cup raspberries
1/2 cup strawberries
2 pitted dates
juice of 1/2 lemon
pinch salt

Blend and pour over your rainbow salad.

Sesame Salad Dressing

To a blender, add…
1 tsp extra virgin coconut oil
1 tbsp of organic peanut or almond butter
2 tbsp hulled sesame seeds
splash water

Blend together and then add 1 tbsp of hulled sesame seeds before drizzling over your salad.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day Recipes

Happy St. Patrick’s Day Recipes

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!!

Here are a few green recipes that are super healthy and very green! (and we promise, no green food colouring!)

Breakfast

Green Pineapple Smoothie Delight

To a high speed blender, add:

2 cups frozen pineapple, diced
2 cups kale or spinach
1 whole orange, with peel removed
1 cored and chopped Granny Smith apple
4 ice cubes
water from a young coconut (or 1 cup water)

Fresh Organic Green Smoothie With Salad, Apple, Cucumber, PineapBlend this up and pour into a tall mug. It will taste somewhat tropical with the pineapple, so maybe add a fancy toothpick umbrella for added fun!

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Lunch

Green Rainbow Salad

Wash a whole head of your favourite greens – romaine, leaf lettuce, spinach or kale.

Tear up your lettuce and add to a large bowl.

Add more greens…
avocado
green grapes
diced cucumber
green pepper
brocoli

healthy fresh vegetable salad and forkThen add your rainbow colours…
red, orange and yellow peppers
cherry tomatoes
shredded purple cabbage
blueberries, and raspberries if you have them.

Green Salad Dressing

Squeeze 3 limes into a bowl
add a drizzle of olive oil
a few shakes of salt
a dash of pepper
10 small stalks of cilantro, chopped

Stir this up and pour over your salad. Enjoy!

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Dinner

Green Broccoli Soup

This is my Mom’s recipe she is sharing with us today. It’s quite delicious, so I hope you enjoy it!

Steam 2 heads of broccoli
Peel, chop and boil 2 medium-large potatoes (enough for 1.5 cups of potato)
Chop 2 onions and sauté in frying pan until translucent/golden

Add all of these to a large crock pot and add;

4 cups reduced sodium chicken broth
1/4 cup almond milk
2 tbsp chopped chives (or to taste)
1 tbsp chopped parsley (or to taste)

Top view of a broccoli soup in a white bowl

Use your hand mixer to chop all of your ingredients into a fine, soup-like texture.

Heat in your crock pot on high for 2 hours and enjoy!

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Dessert

Green Fruit Salad

Peel and chop 3 kiwis into bite sized pieces
Core and chop 1 Granny Smith apple
Chop 20 grapes in half
Chop 1/4 honey dew melon
Core and chop 1 green pear
Peel and chop 1 orange

Add all of these to a large bowl and mix. The orange juice will keep the apple and pear pieces from browning and make a lovely, sweet juice to top off your salad bowl. Enjoy!

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Do I Always Have to Buy Organic? Here’s What You NEED to Know!

organic

I hear this question all the time when discussing the fact that organic produce is so much more expensive than traditionally grown options.  I also hear questions like:

“Why do we need to buy organic anyway?  Is it really that much better?”

Well, you don’t HAVE to buy organic.  However, there are certain items that you should. While others aren’t completely as necessary.  Before outlining them, I want you to consider some of the hidden dangers that lurk in our produce.

pesticides

Pesticides!  What Are They & Why Are They Used?

Pesticides are used for the eradication of pests.  They are extremely toxic substances that are sprayed all over produce to kill any bugs on the food in that in addition pests that may be trying to eat the produce.

What Are Herbicides & Fungicides?

Herbicides are for the eradication of weeds and other plants that interfere with the growth of the crop.  Fungicides are used to eliminate the growth of fungus or diseases that attack the crops.

What Is The Problem With These Chemicals?

Pesticides have been linked to many human health conditions, such as:

  • Nausea
  • Headaches
  • Cancer
  • Reproductive issues
  • Eendocrine disorders

There are also dangers like:

  • Nerve, skin & eye damage
  • Dizziness
  • Systemic poisoning

However, these conditions are more likely to occur in those individuals applying the chemicals.

Most concernedly for the general population are the compounding effects due to long-term exposure or ingestion.

pesticide warning

Potential Dangers Of Pesticides

organic produce

Organic VS Non-Organic Produce, What To Buy!

So, how do you stretch your dollar while still protecting your health?  Listed are fruits and vegetables you should really buy organically and those you can get away without paying extra for organic.

The Dirty Dozen (in order of contamination as of 2019)

This list of The Dirty Dozen are the most heavily sprayed products and should be purchased organically if at all possible:

  • Strawberries
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Nectarines
  • Apples
  • Grapes
  • Peaches
  • Cherries
  • Pears
  • Tomatoes
  • Celery
  • Potatoes

The Clean 15 (in order of least contamination as of 2019)

This list of the Clean 15 can be purchased as conventionally grown produce, as the risk of toxic accumulation and contamination is significantly lower.

organic meat

Do I Need To Buy Meat Organically?

Meat should always be purchased organically whenever possible.  You should also try to source out meat that is free range (chicken), grass fed (beef), wild caught (fish) and everything grown antibiotic free.

This is because these animals, especially cattle and pigs, are so large, they have a much greater ability to accumulate higher degrees of toxins.  For example, they need to eat hundreds of pounds of feed to grow into adulthood.  If they are continually eating feed that has been coated in pesticides while it was growing, they are accumulating these toxins rather quickly.

Add to that the antibiotics and growth hormones in their feed, you are setting yourself up to ingest a toxic stew if you are purchasing meat that is not organic.  I always recommend that if you are going to eat meat, it should be organic!

Organic meat is very expensive at the grocery store, so buy right from the farmer!  Try to find a local farm that raises animals ethically and organically.  Click here to read, “What Meat Do You Eat?” for further information.

For Further reading on ways to live and eat clean, click here to read, “Clean Living – How To Detoxify Your Life!”

With Sources from:

http://www.davidsuzuki.org/what-you-can-do/queen-of-green/faqs/food/what-are-the-dirty-dozen-and-the-clean-fifteen/
http://www.toxicsaction.org/problems-and-solutions/pesticides